Skip to content

ADAA Art Show 2019 Hirschl & Adler Galleries

A Modern Sisterhood: The Rise of American Women Modernists, 1900–1960s

February 28 – March 3, 2019

BLANCHE LAZZELL (1878–1956). West Virginia Coal Works, 1949. Color woodcut on laid Japan paper, 12 x 14 in.

BLANCHE LAZZELL (1878–1956)
West Virginia Coal Works, 1949
Color woodcut on laid Japan paper, 12 x 14 in.
Signed, dated, and inscribed (at lower left): W. Va Coal Works; (at lower center): 531/1; (at lower right): Blanche Lazzell: 1949; (on the verso, at center): Blanche Lazzell / Mar 15, 1949

JANE PETERSON (1876–1965)

JANE PETERSON (1876–1965)
Palm Grove, about 1916–20
Gouache on paper, 18 x 24 in.

Mary Cassatt (1844–1926). Sara in a Bonnet With a Plum Hanging Down at Left (No. 2), about 1906–07. Pastel on paper, 17 x 15 in.

MARY CASSATT (1844–1926)
Sara in a Bonnet With a Plum Hanging Down at Left (No. 2), about 1906–07
Pastel on paper, 17 x 15 in.
Signed (at lower right): Mary Cassatt

SUZY FRELINGHUYSEN (1911–1988)

SUZY FRELINGHUYSEN (1911–1988)
Composition: The Ring, 1943
Oil and collage on Masonite, 24 x 19 3/4 in.
Signed and dated (on the back): Suzy Frelinghuysen / 1943

 

Press Release

While a handful of American women carved out successful careers as professional artists during the 19th century, it wasn’t until the 20th century that more women artists began to enjoy the same opportunity and recognition as their male counterparts. Yet, parity was not easily won. It took a new wave of artistic independence, suffrage, social and sexual upheaval, hard-won battles against opinionated critics and a conservative art establishment, and a preoccupation with a world war to clear the way for acceptance, admiration, and ultimately, acclaim. Women artists’ battle for parity is still being waged today, but the first skirmishes after the turn of the 20th century firmly set its course.

Back To Top