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Edward Priestley, Baltimore

Side Table with Figural Legs

FAPG 18599D

c. 1826

Side Table with Figural Legs, about 1826

Side Table with Figural Legs, about 1826
Edward Priestley, Baltimore, Maryland
Mahogany, with gilt-brass and cut-glass knobs
43 7/8 in. high, 40 3/4 in. high (to table surface), 75 13/16 in. long, 27 11/16 in. deep

Side Table with Figural Legs, about 1826

Side Table with Figural Legs, about 1826
Edward Priestley, Baltimore, Maryland
Mahogany, with gilt-brass and cut-glass knobs
43 7/8 in. high, 40 3/4 in. high (to table surface), 75 13/16 in. long, 27 11/16 in. deep 

Detail of carved "mummy head" leg

Description

Side Table with Figural Legs, about 1826
Edward Priestley (1778–1837), Baltimore, Maryland (active 1802–37)
Mahogany (secondary woods: mahogany, oak, pine, and poplar), with gilt-brass and cut-glass knobs
43 7/8 in. high, 40 3/4 in. high (to table surface), 75 13/16 in. long, 27 11/16 in. deep 

Carved heads, such as those that ornament the present side table—bearded, mustachioed, and with Turkish or Middle Eastern headdresses with tassels—were referred to as “mummy heads” during the early nineteenth century, a generic term for heads ultimately drawn from sources inspired by Egyptian antiquity that became popular in England and France. Adaptations of “mummy heads” were published in Thomas Sheraton’s Cabinet Maker, Upholsterer and General Artist’s Encyclopedia (London, 1804) and later in Thomas Hope’s Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (London, 1807). 

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