Attributed to Emmons & Archibald, Boston

Secrétaire à Abattant

FAPG 19320D

c. 1820–25

Secrétaire à Abattant, about 1820–25
Attributed to [Thomas] Emmons (1784/85–1825) and [George] Archbald (1790–1870), Boston (active together 1814-25)
Mahogany and bird’s eye maple (secondary woods: ash, mahogany, maple, pine, and poplar, partially ebonized and partially gilded), with ormolu mounts, die-rolled gilt-brass moldings filled with lead, marble, mirror plate (in front of the mirror), and leather, variously blind-stamped and gilded
57 3/16 in. high, 37 1/4 in. wide, 19 3/4 in. deep; 34 in. deep with fall front open

Secrétaire à Abattant, about 1820–25
Attributed to [Thomas] Emmons (1784/85–1825) and [George] Archbald (1790–1870), Boston (active together 1814-25)
Mahogany and bird’s eye maple (secondary woods: ash, mahogany, maple, pine, and poplar, partially ebonized and partially gilded), with ormolu mounts, die-rolled gilt-brass moldings filled with lead, marble, mirror plate (in front of the mirror), and leather, variously blind-stamped and gilded
57 3/16 in. high, 37 1/4 in. wide, 19 3/4 in. deep; 34 in. deep with fall front open

Detail with fall front open

Secrétaire à Abattant, about 1820–25
Attributed to [Thomas] Emmons (1784/85–1825) and [George] Archbald (1790–1870), Boston (active together 1814-25)
Mahogany and bird’s eye maple (secondary woods: ash, mahogany, maple, pine, and poplar, partially ebonized and partially gilded), with ormolu mounts, die-rolled gilt-brass moldings filled with lead, marble, mirror plate (in front of the mirror), and leather, variously blind-stamped and gilded
57 3/16 in. high, 37 1/4 in. wide, 19 3/4 in. deep; 34 in. deep with fall front open

Detail with fall front open

Description

Secrétaire à Abattant, about 1820–25
Attributed to [Thomas] Emmons (1784/85–1825) and [George] Archbald (1790–1870), Boston (active together 1814-25)
Mahogany and bird’s eye maple (secondary woods: ash, mahogany, maple, pine, and poplar, partially ebonized and partially gilded), with ormolu mounts, die-rolled gilt-brass moldings filled with lead, marble, mirror plate (in front of the mirror), and leather, variously blind-stamped and gilded
57 3/16 in. high, 37 1/4 in. wide, 19 3/4 in. deep; 34 in. deep with fall front open

EXHIBITED: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, 2007, For Work & For Play: A Selection of American Neo-Classical Furniture, pp. 6–7 illus. in color whole piece and detail of interior, no. 27, lent by a private collector // Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, 2014–15, Very Rich & Handsome, pp. 50–51 cat. 20 illus. in color, 51 open detail

EX COLL: Gardner Family, Boston, Massachusetts, about 1820/25–2004. The first owners of this Secretaire à Abattant were probably John Lowell Gardner (1804–1884), who married Catherine Endicott Peabody (1808–1883) in 1826. The desk then likely passed to their son, George Augustus Gardner (1829–1916), and his wife, Eliza Endicott Peabody Gardner (1834–1876). It then apparently belonged to their son, George Peabody Gardner (1855–1938), and his wife, Esther Burnett Gardner (1859–1954), who in 1916 inherited the family home at 186 Beacon Street, Boston, which had been purchased for his use by his father in 1884. The desk then descended to their son, George Peabody Gardner II (1888-1976), and his wife, Rose Phinney Grosvenor Gardner (1887–1986), who probably moved the piece from 186 Beacon Street to Green Hill, Brookline, which George II had purchased in 1911. The desk subsequently passed by direct descent in the family; [Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York]; to private collection until the present

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