Augmenting the Canon

Recent Acquisitions of American Neo-Classical Decorative Arts

December 13, 2018 – February 6, 2019

Récamier, about 1825

Attributed to Joseph Barry (1757–1838), Philadelphia (active 1794–1833)

Mahogany, with gilt-brass castors and bolster buttons, and upholstery 

34 1/2 in. high, 90 in. long, 24 3/8 in. deep

 

Monumental Pier Table with Brass Inlay, about 1815

Attributed to Joseph Barry (1757–1838), Philadelphia (active 1794–1833)

Mahogany and rosewood, with gilt-brass mounts, die-stamped brass inlay, some inset with ebony, mirror plate, and marble

39 1/8 in. high, 44 1/4 in. wide, 21 7/8 in. deep

Card Table with Lyre Base, about 1815

Philadelphia

Mahogany, striped and bird’s eye maple, and ebony, with gilt-brass paw toe caps and castors, strings for the lyres, and gilt-brass and ormolu mounts

28 1/2 in. high, 35 in. wide, 17 1/2 in. deep at the top, 18 in. deep at the castors; open, 35 x 35 in.

 

Secrétaire à Abattant, about 1820

Attributed to Duncan Phyfe (1770–1854), New York (active 1794–1847)

Mahogany, rosewood, and striped maple, with ormolu mounts, gilt brass, marble, glass, and tooled and gilded leather

64 in. high, 37 3/4 in. wide, 21 3/8 in. deep; 40 5/8 in. deep with desk open

Box Sofa, about 1818–20

Attributed to Duncan Phyfe (1770–1854), New York (active 1794–1847)

Rosewood, and mahogany (feet), partially paint-grained rosewood and gilded, with ormolu mounts, die-stamped brass inlay inset with rosewood, brass line inlay, gilt-brass sabots and castors, and upholstery

33 3/4 in. high, 82 in. long, 27 1/4 in. deep

Pier Table, about 1817–22

Attributed to Duncan Phyfe (1770–1854), New York (active 1794–1847)

Rosewood, with maple [probably] feet painted verde antique and gilded, with die-stamped brass inlay inset with rosewood, ormolu mounts, marble, and mirror plate

36 1/4 in. high, 42 1/4 in. wide, 18 1/8 in. deep (overall)

Cabinet with Mirrored Doors, about 1820

Attributed to Duncan Phyfe (1770–1854), New York (active 1794–1847)

Mahogany, with ormolu capitals and bases, gilt-brass door moldings, keyhole liners, and knobs, marble, and mirror plate

78 5/8 in. high, 35 in. wide, 22 in. deep (overall); 77 in. wide (with both slides extended)

Set of Eight Klismos-form Dining Chairs (two arms and six sides), about 1820

New York ?

Mahogany, with upholstered slip seats

Arms: 32 1/2 in. high, 20 1/4 in. wide, 21 in. deep overall

Sides: 32 7/8 in. high, 18 1/2 in. wide, 20 1/2 in. deep overall

Pair Armchairs en Gondole, about 1835–40

Attributed to Duncan Phyfe (1770–1854), New York (active 1794–1847)

Mahogany, with gilt-brass castors, and upholstery

Each, 34 3/4 in. high, 21 1/2 in. wide, 25 1/8 in. deep overall

Work Table in the Sheraton Taste, about 1810

Attributed to Thomas Seymour (1772–1848), Boston (active alone, 1804–16)

Mahogany, striped and bird’s eye maple, and ebony, with gilt-brass drawer knobs, and fabric work bag

27 3/4 in. high, 19 1/4 in. wide, 15 3/4 in. deep

Pier Table with Carved Tablet, about 1805–10

Thomas Seymour (1772–1848) with Thomas Wightman (1759–1827) as carver, Boston

Mahogany, with gilt-brass and marble

35 1/4 in. high, 55 in. wide, 26 1/2 in. deep

Work Table, about 1819–24

Attributed to Isaac Vose & Son (active 1819–25), with Thomas Seymour (1772–1848) as foreman (active in the Vose Shop, 1819–25), Boston

Rosewood, with die-rolled gilt-brass moldings filled with lead, ormolu mounts, steel castors, and fabric work bag

29 1/2 in. high, 23 in. wide, 17 1/4 in. deep

Cumberland-action Dining Table, about 1815–20

Attributed to Thomas Seymour (1772–1848; active in the Vose Shop, 1819–25), possibly for Isaac Vose, Boston

Mahogany, with gilt-brass toe-caps and castors

28 3/4 in. high, 62 1/4 in. long, 60 in. wide; with leaves down, 60 in. long, 17 in. wide

Pier Table, about 1818–20

Attributed to Thomas Seymour (1772–1848) working for James Barker (active together, 1817–19), or Isaac Vose & Son (active 1819–25), with Thomas Wightman (1759–1827) as carver (active in the Vose shop, 1815–25), Boston

Mahogany, with marble and mirror plate

36 in. high, 50 3/4in. wide, 21 5/8 in. deep

 

Set of Twelve Klismos-form Side Chairs, about 1822–24

Attributed to Isaac Vose & Son (active 1819–25), with Thomas Seymour  (1772–1848) as foreman (active in the Vose Shop, 1819–25), Boston

Mahogany, with upholstered slip seats

Each, 34 in. high, 18 13/16 in. wide, 23 1/8 in. deep (overall)

Seven-drawer Tall Chest, about 1825

Boston

Mahogany (secondary woods: mahogany, pine, and poplar)

45 5/8 in. high, 27 5/8 in. wide, 14 5/8 in. deep
 

Painted Chinese Red and Gilded “Fancy” Side Chair, about 1815

Attributed to Thomas S. Renshaw and John Barnhart, Baltimore (active about 1814–15)

Mahogany, painted and gilded, with caning

32 1/2 in. high, 19 in. wide, 21 in. deep overall

Painted Black and Gilded “Fancy” Side Chair, about 1830

Attributed to John (1777–1851) and Hugh (1781–1831) Finlay, Baltimore (active about 1800/01–30)

Poplar, painted and gilded, with die-stamped gilt-brass rosettes, caning, and original red moreen fabric [beneath replacement fabric on rondel]

33 3/4 in. high, 18 5/8 in. wide, 23 3/4 in. deep overall

Pair Eagle Wall Brackets, about 1820

American

Pine and spruce, gessoed and gilded

14 3/8 in. high, 14 5/8 in. wide, 9 7/8 in. deep

Pair Wall Brackets, 1830s

American

Pine, gessoed and gilded

11 in. high, 11 5/16 in. wide, 8 in. deep

Banjo Clock (The “Improved Timepiece”), about 1805

Simon Willard (1753–1848), Roxbury, Massachusetts (active early 1780s–1823)

Wood, gessoed and partially gilded and painted white, with églomisé glass panels, brass, painted dial, glass, and clock mechanism

42 7/8 in. high, 10 7/8 in. wide, 5 5/8 in. deep

 

Banjo Clock (The “Improved Timepiece”), 1823–26

Simon Willard & Son, Roxbury, Massachusetts (active 1823–26)

Mahogany, ebonized, partially stenciled with gold leaf and bronze powder, with églomisé glass panels, brass, painted dial, glass, and clock mechanism

40 1/4 in. high

The Finding of Moses, about 1810

Lydia Townsend, at Mrs. Saunders’ and Miss Beach’s Academy, Dorchester, Massachusetts

Frame and églomisé mat probably supplied by John Doggett (1780–1857), Roxbury, Massachusetts

Silk embroidery thread and watercolor on silk, with églomisé mat and gilded frame

16 3/8 x 12 1/8 in. (sight size); 20 5/8 x 15 5/8 in. (strainer size); 24 x 18 7/8 in. (overall, including frame)

Memorial to Ebenezer Clap[p], about 1804–07

Ann Clap[p], at Mrs. Saunders’ and Miss Beach’s Academy, Dorchester, Massachusetts

Frame and églomisé mat probably supplied by John Doggett (1780–1857), Roxbury, Massachusetts

Silk embroidery thread and watercolor on silk, with églomisé mat and gilded frame

16 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. (sight size); 20 3/8 x 14 3/4 in. (strainer size); 23 5/8 x 18 in. (overall, including frame)

Memorial to Captain George Runey, about 1812

Hannah Runey (about 1795–1844), at Charlestown Academy, Charlestown, Massachusetts

Silk embroidery thread and watercolor on silk, with appliqué of printer’s type on silk, and with original églomisé mat and gilded frame

19 3/8 x 17 1/2 in. (oval sight size); 24 x 21 1/8 in. (overall, including frame)

Two-light Argand Chandelier, about 1825

Johnston Brookes & Co., London (active 1814–35)

Retailed by Bemis & Vose, Boston (active 1825–31)

Gilt and patinated bronze, with lamp mechanism, glass shades, blown, frosted, and wheel-cut, and glass chimneys

31 3/8 in. high, 17 7/8 in. long, 10 1/2 in. wide

Sinumbra Lamp, after 1826

English, probably Birmingham

Retailed by Lewis Veron & Co., Philadelphia (active 1826–41)

Gilt and patinated bronze, with lamp mechanism, glass shade, blown, frosted, and wheel-cut, and glass chimney

30 1/4 in. high (to the top of chimney)

Pair Argand Lamps, after 1827

English, probably Birmingham

Retailed by Baldwin Gardiner (1796–1869), New York (active in New York, 1827–47)

Gilt and patinated bronze, with lamp mechanism, glass shades, blown and frosted, glass prisms, and glass chimneys

Each, 17 in. high

Monumental Double Argand Lamp with Serpent Arms, about 1820

English, probably Birmingham

Bronze and brass, with dark brown patina, with glass shades, blown, frosted, and wheel-cut, and glass chimneys

22 3/4 in. high, 21 1/2 in. wide, 10 1/2 in. deep (overall)

Small Sinumbra Lamp, about 1830

William Carleton, Boston (active about 1820–60)

Gilt and patinated bronze, with lamp mechanism, glass shade, blown, frosted, and wheel-cut, and glass chimney

18 1/2 in. high (to the top of chimney)

Sinumbra Lamp, 1832–35

Henry N. Hooper, Boston (active about 1832–68)

Patinated and gilt bronze, with lamp mechanism, glass shade, blown, frosted, and wheel-cut, and glass chimney

25 3/4 in. high (to the top of chimney)

Student Lamp, about 1832–35

Henry N. Hooper, Boston (active about 1832–68)

Gilt bronze, in a matte and burnished finish, with painted and gilt-brass shade, lamp mechanism, and glass chimney

20 in. high

Covered Ewer, about 1807–09

Simon Chaudron (1758–1846), Philadelphia

Silver

16 1/2 in. high

Ewer, 1809–12

Chaudron’s & Rasch (Simon Chaudron [1758–1846] and Anthony Rasch [about 1778–about 1859]), Philadelphia (active together, 1809–12)

Silver

13 in. high

Five-piece Tea/Coffee Service, about 1815

Fletcher & Gardiner (Thomas Fletcher [1787–1866] and Sidney Gardiner [1785–1827]), Philadelphia (active together, 1811–27)

Silver, with wooden handles, ebonized

Coffee pot: 9 1/2 in. high

Chalice

Fletcher & Gardiner (Thomas Fletcher [1787–1866] and Sidney Gardiner [1785–1827]), Philadelphia (active together, 1811–27)

Silver

7 7/8 in. high

Monumental Ewer, about 1835

Thomas Fletcher (1787–1866), Philadelphia (active alone, 1827–42)

Silver

15 7/16 in. high

Round Cake Basket with Reticulated Border and Handle

Baldwin Gardiner (1791–1869), New York (active in New York, 1827–47)

Silver

11 in. high (with handle raised), 12 1/4 in. diameter

Cruet Frame

Baldwin Gardiner (1791–1869), New York (active in New York, 1827–47)

Silver, with clear glass bottles, blown and cut

11 1/4 in. high, 11 5/8 in. diameter (at the feet)

Pair of Flared Vases with Floral Decoration, about 1832–38

Tucker Factories, Philadelphia (active 1826–38)

Porcelain, partially painted and gilded

8 1/2 in. high, 8 1/16 in. diameter (at the top)

The Andrew Craig Walker Handled Urn, 1828

Tucker Factories, Philadelphia (active 1826–38)

Porcelain, partially painted in polychrome and gilded, with an iron tie-rod for assembly

10 11/16 in. high 

Chinese Export Porcelain Covered Two-section Vegetable Dish from the Joseph R. Sims “Washington Memorial” Service, about 1800–05

Chinese, for the American Market

Porcelain, partially painted and gilded

6 3/4 in high, 11 in. long, 9 1/4 in. deep

Clear “Strawberry Diamond and Fan” Pitcher, about 1820–25

Bakewell, Page & Bakewell, Pittsburgh (active 1808–82)

Glass, blown and cut

8 1/4 in. high

Pair Clear Blown and Cut Whale Oil Lamps, about 1830–35

Attributed to Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Sandwich, Massachusetts (active 1825–88)

Glass, blown and cut, and pressed, with pewter burners

13 1/6 in. high (to the top of the burners)

Pair Opaque Blue Slag Lamps with Lion Bases, about 1830

New England Glass Company, Cambridge, Massachusetts (active 1818–88), or Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Sandwich, Massachusetts (active 1825–88)

Glass, pressed and blown-molded, with pewter collars

9 5/8 in. high (to the top of the pewter collars)

Clear “Strawberry Diamond” Bowl with Cross, about 1830

Attributed to Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Sandwich, Massachusetts (active 1825–88), or New England Glass Company, Cambridge, Massachusetts (active 1818-88)

Glass, pressed

1 3/4 in. high, 12 1/8 in. diameter

Clear “Cape Cod Lily” Footed Vase, about 1830

Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Sandwich, Massachusetts (active 1825–88)

Eastern white pine, gessoed and gilded, with mirror plate

Glass, pressed

7 3/8 in. high

Deep Amethyst “Lacy” Compote in the “Princess Feather” Pattern, about 1835–45

Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Sandwich, Massachusetts (active 1825–88)

Glass, pressed

6 1/4 in. high, 10 5/8 in. long, 8 3/4 in. wide

Press Release

In honor of the sixty-fifth anniversary of Hirschl & Adler Galleries and Stuart Feld’s fiftieth year as Director of the firm, we are pleased to announce the opening of Augmenting the Canon, Recent Acquisitions of American Neo-Classical Decorative Arts on Thursday, December 13, 2018. This exhibition will be the inaugural decorative arts show in Hirschl & Adler’s new home at the, the Fuller Building, a legendary art destination at the crossroads of 57th Street and Madison Avenue. The exhibition is the eleventh in a series devoted to American decorative arts.

Augmenting the Canon will include about sixty masterpieces of Neo-Classical furniture, embroidery, silver, lighting, ceramics, and glass made in America, or in England, France, or China expressly for an American clientele between the first years of the nineteenth century and the early 1840s. Included will be many works that have never previously been exhibited or published in a scholarly context.

Illustrating the strength and breadth of American artistry and workmanship during the early years of the Republic, and the collecting habits of the patrons who bought or commissioned the works at the time they were made, this exhibition is an in-depth visual study of the indigenously American Neo-Classicism that Hirschl & Adler Galleries has previously explored through exhibitions and publications over the last twenty-seven years. The artworks included in Augmenting the Canon are shown and discussed within the framework of an area of expertise and appreciation that has grown exponentially over the past twenty years, and has recently been the focus of meaningful scholarship disseminated through museum exhibitions, books, articles, and symposia.    

Augmenting the Canon brings forth many new and exciting discoveries – and some rediscoveries – at the highest level of production in the various decorative arts media that were being produced in Federal and Neo-Classical America. This exhibition adds significant examples to the known “canon” of those already published and exhibited, and broadens the depth of our knowledge of a field that is still emerging as an important collectible. For example, a richly-figured mahogany pier table attributed to Joseph Barry of Philadelphia, with a profusion of die-stamped brass inlaid into rosewood panels, which has been in a private collection for fifty years, now comes to light to augment our knowledge of what was being produced there at the time. And a Philadelphia récamier, also attributed to Barry, has finally emerged from the family for which it was made two-hundred years ago, to claim its place as the finest example within its genre.

In several instances, this show presents works that are identical, or nearly identical, to examples long held in venerable American museums, including, for example a Thomas Seymour work table that is identical to one in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; a Duncan Phyfe box sofa that may be the original mate to one that Hirschl & Adler sold to the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002; and rare and perfect examples of American glass, from the Bakewell factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the Sandwich glassworks in Massachusetts.

Background to the broad selection of decorative arts will be provided by a number of paintings and works on paper of the period, including important works by John Wesley Jarvis, Nicolino Calyo, Auguste Edouart, Francis Guy, and Gilbert Stuart, among several dozen others.  

Augmenting the Canon will remain on view through Wednesday, February 6, 2019, and will be accompanied by an elaborate catalogue in which all of the objects will be documented through individual essays and illustrations. A comprehensive introductory essay will deal with issues of context, the history of scholarship in the field, new scholarship, and the goals and techniques of responsible conservation.  The catalogue will be available for sale on Amazon.com or through the gallery by mail. 

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